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Saskatchewan River: End of Steel

Canada's northernmost metropolis

More on the Saskatchewan River:
Saskatchewan River:
From glaciers to grasslands

Early Bird:
Beaked dinosaur is missing link to birds

Dry Bones:
Dinosours abound in Alberta’s badlands

Plains Speaking:
Pioneer in the fight for women’s rights

Last Stand:
The Northwest Rebellions ends Métis autonomy

End of Steel:
Canada's northernmost metropolis

Dirty Thirties:
Prairie life in the era of the Bennett Buggy

Unwild West:
Mounties keep order on the Prairies

Dream of Wheat:
Prosperous farmers feed the world

Wonder City:
Saskatoon sprouts from the Prairie

Edmonton is the northernmost big city in North America. Once, it was called “End of Steel,” known for little more than the fact that the railway went no further north.

Calgary was directly on the main Canadian Pacific Railway line and boomed as a cattle and railway centre. Then the competing Canadian Northern pushed through Edmonton to the Pacific Coast and the city joined the mainstream of western development. Edmonton became the capital of the young province of Alberta.

At the turn of the 20th century, Edmonton is a city that likes to keep starting afresh. Few older buildings survive amid the sparkling glass towers of its downtown. The West Edmonton Mall is the world's biggest shopping centre and visitors drive and fly from far away to experience its size and theme-park-style attractions.




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Adobe PDF downloadSaskatchewan River (Adobe PDF document) Adobe PDF downloadRivers of Canada (All pages in a zipped file)


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